There And Draft Again

A Fellowship of Fantasy Writers

Creating Your Fantasy Bible: Characters October 26, 2013

I’m not entirely sure why I thought I would be wrapping up the Encyclobibliogrimoire series today with Magic, but we’re gonna hold off on that seeing as how I only glossed over a major, MAJOR component of every story:

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I’m sure you guys wouldn’t have forgotten this component of your Encyclobibliogrimoire, but we’ll go over it anyway. The first suggestion I would have, that is not all biased, would be to go back over some of the character building posts we’ve made here at TADA over the past year. There’s some good stuff in there. And to be a pal, I’m even going to compile a list for you:

Oh, and don’t forget to take your character’s race into account (See: Creating Your Fantasy Bible: Races) So how do all of these posts help us with our Encyclobibliogrimoire? Easy. They help us to create well-rounded and unique characters. Don’t lean on stereotypes, and never treat any character like a throwaway character in your books. If a character appears on your pages, they should have a place in your story bible. World-building isn’t always just about the world itself. A lot of draw in fantasy novels is how real your characters are and how well your audience can connect to them.

First, start with the basics. I already listed those before, but lets go over them again. Depending on how minor the characters are, not all of these will apply. But you should at least try to fill out as many as possible. It will do wonders for helping you get a good grip on that character.

    • Name
    • Age
    • Birthday
    • Birth Place
    • Race
    • Physical description
    • Abilities
    • Family members
    • Best friend
    • Love interest

Next, get into their character traits and history. I put these two together because a lot of times they go hand in hand. My main character Zelene has an attitude and a chip on her shoulder, but she is also one of the most compassionate and passionate characters in the book. Why? Because she grew up in the ugly side of the foster-care system and was physically abused most of her life. This is the reason for her anger, and for her empathy when she sees other downtrodden people.

After you’ve nailed down their history, get into the plot points they have to deal with in your story. It seems silly to outline everything again from the fabulous storyboard I’m sure you’ve made, but it’s more important than you might think. This will help you to track your character’s progress throughout your story. As writers, we never want our characters to be stagnant. We write about the journeys they are on, and those journeys change them as they move forward. Track this, and make sure your character is developing the way you want them to.

Next, talk about relationships. You might have already covered this in the previous two points, but it’s a good idea to at least have a rough list of the relationships your character has and what kind. Do they have a good, strong relationship with their parents? Do they hate their brother? Idolize their best friend? All of these things effect how they react in certain situations.

Last, talk to your character. I recently did a blog tour for Heirs of War, and did several character interviews as tour stops. I was surprised by how refreshing it was to sit down and talk to my characters like they were real. You’re a writer–you come up with the conversation. It might feel silly at first. I know the first time I tried this years ago after reading that J.R. Ward did this, I felt like a complete idiot. My suggestion? Don’t use a questionnaire that is already filled out. Think about what you would want to say to your characters, or what they might want to say to you. I know Tate has some choice words for me…Anyway. You might be surprised and get to see a whole different side to your characters that you didn’t realize was there.

Whew. Now I feel better about the character portion of the Encycliobibliogrimoire. It was sorely lacking before. Next time we’ll talk about magic, but I want to hear your thoughts. Think I missed anything this go round with characters? Think we had enough covered before? See me in the comments!

  ~Mara Valderran
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One Response to “Creating Your Fantasy Bible: Characters”

  1. devenluca Says:

    This is definitely something that I need to use more often. Thanks for the good read. 🙂


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