There And Draft Again

A Fellowship of Fantasy Writers

A Bad Review: One Person’s Opinion… May 1, 2014

I must admit I’m pretty jaded by Amazon reviews. I’m sorry to say a five star review won’t induce me to part with my hard-earned cash, any more than a one star soul-stomping-hatred-fest will put me off something that really appeals.

My favourite fantasy author of the moment is Patrick Rothfuss. I devoured The Name of the Wind, and Wise Man’s Fear, the first two books in the Kingkiller Chronicles, loving the world, the characters, the glorious plot tangles and even the narrative structure. And I’m desperately awaiting the next instalment Doors of Stone.

And I’m not the only one to enjoy the books either. They have a 4.5 star rating on Amazon. So it was with much surprise I stumbled across my first scathing review of the book:

Kvothe makes me wanna gouge my eyes out. He’s that annoying. I know fantasy is attractive because it diverts us from the humdrum of our normal, uninteresting lives, and I’m aware that a heroic character should be more powerful and awesome than your regular joe. But seriously, if Kvothe excels beyond the realm of understanding in one more thing, I’ll scream.
I’d list all the achievements young Kvothe has earned himself but I just don’t have enough room. And I honestly cant swallow another list covering All That Is Supremely Awesome About Kvothe.

Wow. The reviewer J.J. Maken (read the whole review here) hated with a passion the very things that I really enjoyed about the books. Kvothe and his ridiculous giftedness was something I enjoyed about the story, particularly because he could be so good at some things and then completely clueless in other areas (like pretty much any interaction with women).

However rather than being upset on behalf of my own opinion, it reminded me that people have different tastes – and I thought J.J. Maken was at least able to articulate why the story didn’t work for her, instead of bashing the intelligence of the author or other readers who did like the book.

I prefer to like my protagonist as I’m reading, not secretly pray he dies a painful, drawn out death. I really loathed this book. I wish there had been more negative reviews available before I bought it.

I wish there were more negative reviews as interesting as this one.

My advice is read the reviews if you find they help. But the best person to judge whether a book is going to suit you, is you. Read the blurb, check out a sample, and try your luck.

What are your thoughts on Amazon reviews? Or any form of creative review?

– by Raewyn Hewitt

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Darth Vader & The Knights of Rilch by Rachel O’Laughlin January 18, 2014

Filed under: Reading — thereanddraftagain @ 6:00 am
Tags: , , , , ,

Have you ever noticed how over the course of the three original Star Wars movies, Darth Vader gets a bit more impressive with each one? His shoulders get a bit broader. His voice gets deeper. He just appears more menacing. At least it always seemed that way to me.

Where writing is concerned, that’s what I expect of a series. The first book may be good in its own right, but the second is usually a bit better, as the author starts to find their stride. Characters are becoming more filled out. The good become better. The evil more evil. The ambiguous become even more blurred. The seeds of plot scattered across the ground in the first have taken root, and are starting to grow. If this doesn’t happen, if that second book is weak, or just a rehashing of the first, or if it feels as though we’re not reaching a crescendo, I won’t go on. Likewise, if it feels totally disjointed from the first, I’m done.

When I read Coldness of Marek last year, the first book in Rachel O’Laughlin’s Serengard Series I was blown away. I devoured it. I loved the characters, the world, the plot–pretty much everything about it. I hated the ending. Not because it wasn’t good, but simply because it…well…ended. I waited with anticipation for the second book, Knights of Rilch. Well,waited with my usual blend of impatience, anticipation, and skepticism. I’ve read too many series where the second book falls flat. I didn’t think that would be the case here, and I was right.

Knights of Rilch is Darth Vader in The Empire Strikes Back. Broader, more intense, and I found myself unable to put it down. Questions that had haunted me since Coldness of Marek were answered. New questions were raised. Characters surprised me. There were a few chuckles and, yes, some tears. I’m not a softy, so when an author can make me care that deeply about a character, they’ve done their job and then some. And even though the story jumps from present to past and back again, I never felt lost or confused. That takes a deft hand to pull off. Rachel O’Laughlin makes it look easy.

With a plot involving political intrigue, rebellion, war, scheming, and characters holding themselves out to be something other than they are, Knights of Rilch could have become a clunky monster struggling under its own weight. Could have, in less skilled hands. In Rachel O’Laughlin’s hands it is a sweeping tale of loss, pride, and the challenge of holding onto your beliefs when it seems it would be wiser to just let go. She gives us characters with all their faults, all the subtle shades of grey that make them seem so real. Her world-building is incredible. Her storytelling exquisite. The ending…

Once again I’m left flipping my Kindle over, as though there may be more on the backside of it, and screaming, “Noooooooooooooo!!!!”

Final_WebVersionBlurb:

Nearly a decade ago…
When Serengard rebelled and the Orion monarchy fell, former crown princess Kierstaz Orion’s love for her people became a burning desire to set things right. With a price on their heads, Kierstaz and her brother Mikel led a handful of Border Guard against the new army along the border of Dreibourge. But months of heavy bloodshed forced her small band of knights to abandon the border — and all of Serengard — to the rebels.
Nine years and a thousand betrayals later…
Kierstaz and Mikel again find themselves on the run, only this time, they’ve a boy in tow: Malcom, the son of two of the Seren rebellion’s strongest leaders. The new regime wants him dead, Mikel wants him alive, and it’s all Kierstaz can do to keep their tracks covered. Desperate to preserve the innocent life she’s sworn to protect, and afraid Mikel’s may be forfeit, Kierstaz must gamble the last thing in the world she owns — her identity. Secrets are a staple of the Orion family, and those Kierstaz keeps are as dangerous as the ones kept from her.
Author Bio:
Rachel O’Laughlin grew up writing adventure stories in which heroines tend to get their hands dirty, bad guys sometimes win, and someone always gets kidnapped. Her passion for all things history morphed into a love for fantasy in her late teens. Lattes and The Fray are daily dwellers in her home in New England, where she lives with her husband and children.
~ Kathi